Retrospect

< Previous         Next >  
The Levine laboratory and the discovery of p53
Daniel Linzer*
Research Corporation for Science Advancement, Tucson, AZ 85712, USA
*Correspondence to:Daniel Linzer, E-mail: dlinzer@rescorp.org
J Mol Cell Biol, Volume 11, Issue 7, July 2019, Pages 534-535  https://doi.org/10.1093/jmcb/mjz027

As a first-year graduate student in the fall of 1976, I completed a research rotation on DNA tumor viruses in Arnie Levine's laboratory at Princeton and then decided on that research area and research group for my doctoral work. Arnie welcomed me into his laboratory with his typically infectious enthusiasm and high energy. At the time, graduate students and postdoctoral fellows in the group were working on a number of DNA viruses. Among those was simian virus 40 (SV40), and Arnie pointed me toward a set of questions on this virus's infectious cycle in monkey cells and its ability to induce tumor formation in mice. It turned out that these separate questions converged.